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P90X2 Top 10 Questions

 

Fitness expert and all around good guy, Steve Edwards, came out with a new article yesterday talking all about the Top 10 Questions about P90X2. These are the burning questions that people have been asking that haven’t quite been set straight yet. I know that I have been passing around articles this week but I do this for a reason. These are great articles that contain relevant information that I find crucial for those who are interested in P90X2. Since P90X2 is a huge interest of mine, I wanted to make sure that I am passing all the latest and greatest information onto you and my team. Being a P90X2 cast member I feel like it is my responsibility to you all who come to my website everyday.  Not to mention Steve Edwards is a wealth of health and fitness knowledge.  II had the opportunity to chat with him at the P90X2 shoot, (and by chat I mean cornered the poor guy for over an hour), and the Coach summit and I soaked up what he was saying like a sponge.  So, here is!

The Top 10 Questions About P90X2
By Steve Edwards

What’s the difference between P90X and P90X2? This is the question of the year, and it can’t be answered in a simple sentence, or even one article. So I’ve written this series to help you decide whether or not P90X2 is the program for you. I wish I could tell all of you that P90X2 is right for you, but I’m too responsible for that. I’m sure one of Beachbody’s huge collection of programs will work for each of you, but if you want to know specifically whether that right one is P90X2, read on.

1.  Is P90X2 better than P90X? How can you beat the most popular workout program in the country? You can’t. P90X2 is an extension of P90X. Not necessarily better, but it’s definitely evolved. For a more in-depth look at its development, read the first article in this series (see “The Next X: What’s New About P90X2?” in the Related Articles section below).

Tony Horton
2.  Is it more Muscle Confusion? You betcha! If you thought your muscles were confused last time around, you ain’t seen nothin’ yet!

3.  Is it harder? Remember the first time you did P90X? Could anything feel harder than that? Probably not. So while P90X2 isn’t technically harder, it’s probably going to feel harder until you get used to it. And since it’s Muscle Confusion, it’s going to take you some time to adapt. During this adaptation period, it’s going to feel very difficult, but you’re used to that, right? And when you take your X2 body back to another round of P90X, that program’s going to feel harder too, because you’ll be prepared to push yourself farther than ever before.

Tony Horton
4.  Is it still 6 days per week? No, it’s only 5, though we suggest active recovery on your rest days. The more intensely you work out, the less time you need to spend doing it. With more breakdown, you also need more rest. P90X2 has evolved to the point where less is more.

5.  Will there be options like Lean and Doubles? Instead of giving you different program options, P90X2 gives you the option of increasing each phase long enough to get the most out of it. If you’re having trouble with your balance, you may decide to spend more time in Phase One. For bigger muscles, spend more time in Phase Two. Want to get faster, jump higher, or become more agile? Spend more time mastering Phase Three. You’ll definitely want to read the guidebook, because it provides ideas for how to tailor your training personally for you (and much more). In P90X, we made the most versatile home fitness program ever created. P90X2 will open up even more

Tony Horton
6.  Is it true that there’s no cardio? Here’s a little secret: There was no true cardio in P90X, either. At least not in the kind of training generally associated with that word. P90X used anaerobic interval training to improve your cardiovascular system, which although it’s technically cardio, it isn’t the public perception of cardio. “Cardio” is a training colloquialism for training your heart. So while you won’t see any cardio in the title names, doing Plyocide or P.A.P. Lower will train your cardiovascular system as well as any cardio routine you’ve ever done.

7.  Will I need any new equipment? There’s a lot of new equipment for P90X2, and you’ll eventually want to own all of it. But the cool thing is that we’ve created an option that can be done with nothing but a few exercise bands and furniture found in any hotel room. This “hotel room” option virtually eliminates excuses for not working out.

Tony Horton
8.  So what is this equipment? Here’s a list of the equipment needed, which we’ll go into in detail in a later article. Did I say “needed”? It’s not, really. Besides the hotel room option, we also do most movements in a variety of ways to make it easy to add equipment as you can afford it. Here’s a prioritized list:

  • Bands and/or weights: You need some form of resistance.
  • Pull-up bar: Just like P90X.
  • Yoga mat: You must have one of these by now, right?
  • Stability ball: We highly recommend this, because the benefits outweigh the cost many times over…and over.
  • Foam roller: You may not have heard of this before, but don’t be surprised if it changes your life.
  • Push-up stands: You know ‘em. You love ‘em. How come you don’t already have them?
  • Medicine balls: Mainly used for balance, so easily replaced with substitutes (basketballs, etc.) if need be, though once you’ve used the real thing you’ll wonder why you ever waited to buy them.
  • Pull-up assist: While highly optional (we got away with chairs all these years), the pull-up assist will not only improve your ability to finish all your reps, it’ll greatly improve both your form and exercise efficiency.
  • Yoga blocks: If you need these, you probably have them already.

Tony Horton
9.  Foam rolling? What the?! Foam rolling is a myofascial release technique. Hmm . . . not much help? Okay, how about this? It’s a form of self-massage that forces your muscles to lengthen and align properly. Used regularly, it’ll increase your mobility and range of motion and actually help you get stronger, because it frees your muscles to work the way they’re supposed to. This one simple practice is often enough to change your alignment and allow you to move freer and easier.

10.  How has the diet plan changed? For P90X2, the diet has evolved along with the exercise plan. Not that there was anything wrong with the old one, but we’ve been listening to your suggestions and we’ve revamped the diet guide to give you more options on what to eat, how to increase effectiveness, and how to simplify the entire eating process. This subject is more than we can cover here, so the X2 nutrition plan is the topic of next week’s P90X2 article.

 

10 comments
Shams
Shams

Hey sean... Just started P90X2 almost four weeks ago and still a little confused on the how long each phase needs to be. I want to focus on Foundation and strength, Which means doing 6 weeks of each. But with the recovery week and performance phase, that might go over 90 days. Is it preferred to keep the program 90 days or for as long as i need it? since if i max out each phase, the program will go into a duration of 4.5 months. I don't know if i'm focusing on too many aspects of fitness at once for the first round.

Drew
Drew

much appreciated thanks. the issue was partially space and partially cost. I ended up getting 2 small soccer balls with enough space for me to put my hands one. I guess the rest of the instability is going to come from using one foot for now haha. thanks for the reply!

Drew
Drew

Hey sean... I've got a question before I invest in p90x2. I live in a residence in university and there is very little space. I was looking at the moves list and equipment required on the sheets and saw medicine can be replaces with towells. Is the "medicine ball" basically a towell rolled up into a ball format? p..s congrats again on being part of it!

David
David

I have a bum knee. I completed the P90X program and only missed a total of 5 workouts, none of which was a weight or strength program. I continued using P90X after that. I modified a lot with Plyo and Cardio and it did not bother my knee. So.........that Plyocide routine doesnt look very friendly to knees. So what do you think? A friend of mine gave me the Insanity routine. I said no way!!! That program is NOT recommended by me for anyone with knee or back issues. LOL

Ahmed
Ahmed

when its going to be realesed ?

Coach Sean
Coach Sean

@Shams: Each phase is customized based on how long you need it. If you want to focus on foundation and strength, I would do 4 weeks of foundation and 4-6 weeks of strength. It isn't necessarily preferred to keep the program at 90 days. Have you seen my P90X2 schedule? Definitely check it out. It shows you how to focus on strength and keep it at 90 days.

Coach Sean
Coach Sean

@drew: No problem! Let me know what other questions you have

Coach Sean
Coach Sean

@Drew: I workout in very little space myself as well. If you have enough room to do a push up then you have enough room to use the medicine balls. They are fairly small and fit easily into a closet as well. The only thing that takes up space is the stability ball really. The medicine balls can't really be replaced with towels on the moves but there is a modifier in each exercise that shows you how to do it without med balls/stability balls/pull up bar. I would get what ever you have space for. The Deluxe kit will save you money in the long run. That's what I got.

Coach Sean
Coach Sean

@David: Good call not doing Insanity if you have knee problems. Plyocide is a mixture of Plyo moves with balance and stability moves so you might not have to modify as much as you think. Also, with 14 workouts you will be able to do a lot more now.